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FREE Wigs for Hairloss

Funding for temporary or permanent hairloss

If you live in New Zealand and have experienced either temporary or permanent hairloss, contact Janine on 027 367 7686 to walk you through the process.

You will need to go to your GP and get a medical certificate stating:

  • The reason for your hairloss (eg. surgery, alopecia, chemotherapy).
  • Your NHI number (National Health Index). Your doctor will have this available.
  • Stated whether your hairloss is permanent or temporary.

Then make contact and leave the rest to Janine. You can then choose your wigs up to a certain, pre-approved value which will be between $400.00 and $2280.00,  depending on whether your hairloss is temporary or permanent.

Hair is called a woman’s “crowning glory”, and for good reason; it symbolizes attractiveness, success, health, and social status, among other things. Losing it can have a dramatic emotional impact on a woman’s self-esteem. Many women feel that when they lose their hair, they’ve lost a large part of who they are.

Common Causes of Hair Loss in Women

Alopecia is the medical term for excessive or abnormal hair loss, which is a sign that something is wrong with your body. Hormone imbalance, disease, certain medications or lifestyle factors can cause a change in the hair growth and shedding phases. Once the cause is dealt with, hairs go back to their random pattern of growth and shedding, and abnormal hair loss stops.

Fortunately, hair loss may simply be a reaction to a short-term event such as stress, pregnancy, and the taking of certain medications. In these situations, hair will grow back once the event has passed.

  • Medical conditions involving hormonal imbalances
  • Androgen sensitivity (resulting in Androgenetic Alopecia)
  • Menopause
  • Thyroid disorders
  • PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome)
  • Lifestyle factors
  • Immune system irregularities (resulting in Alopecia Areata)
  • Physical and/or emotional stress (resulting in Telogen Effluvium)
  • Nutritional deficiencies (especially protein, iron, zinc or vitamin A)
  • Lack of sleep
  • Chemotherapy treatments (resulting in Anagen Effluvium)
  • Chemotherapy

At SS Hairwear, we understand how difficult it is to deal with hair loss as Janine lost her entire hair within a six week time-frame.

We’re dedicated to easing you through this transitional time. You may feel like a part of you is going or gone and we’re here to help you discover you are still you —  which in turn can make all the difference in the way you feel.

Hairloss affects everyone differently. Some people will lose all of their hair, while others may only experience thinning, some find bald spots that grow over and some never see their hair again.

There are many options available to you in coping with hair loss. While some women gravitate toward turbans and scarves, others are most comfortable in a wig and some choose to wear their baldness proudly. Coming to terms with the fact that you need to wear a wig can be very emotional, but a wig can also be the key to helping you feel more like yourself again. With it you can look and feel just like a ‘normal’ person, and not a hairloss patient. The key is to try and embrace your wig, because there is no shame in wearing one. It can actually be fun!

All our wigs, including our Medical Hair Loss Wig styles have special features like an ultra-comfortable, non-allergenic gel lining and lightweight, breathable construction.

The emotional effects of hair loss

Hair loss is a problem traditionally associated with men, but it can be just as traumatic for women. A woman’s hair is called her “crowning glory,” and for good reason; it symbolizes attractiveness, success, health and social status, among other things. Losing it can have a dramatic emotional impact on a woman’s self-esteem. Many women feel that when they lose their hair, they’ve lost a large part of who they are.

Medical conditions involving hormonal imbalances

  • Androgen sensitivity (resulting in Androgenetic Alopecia)
  • Menopause
  • Thyroid disorders
  • PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome)

Lifestyle factors

  • Immune system irregularities (resulting in Alopecia Areata)
  • Physical and/or emotional stress (resulting in Telogen Effluvium)
  • Nutritional deficiencies (especially protein, iron, zinc or vitamin A)
  • Lack of sleep

Chemotherapy treatments (resulting in Anagen Effluvium)

The most common type of hair loss among women is female pattern thinning, or androgenetic alopecia. Most commonly seen after menopause, it is characterized by thinning of the hair, usually beginning at the crown of the head and moving forward.

For many years, scientists thought that androgenetic alopecia was caused by the predominance of the male sex hormone testosterone, which women also have in trace amounts under normal conditions. While testosterone is at the core of the balding process, dihydrotes-tosterone (or DHT) – a derivative of testosterone – is thought to be the main culprit. DHT builds up around hair follicles, shrinking them and making it impossible for healthy hair to survive.

The hair follicle’s resistance to DHT is genetic, so if other members of your family (on either side) have thinning hair, there’s a good chance that at some point you’ll experience it as well.

Androgenic alopecia can also be triggered by a variety of factors tied to hormones, including the presence of ovarian cysts, the taking of high androgen–index birth control pills, pregnancy and menopause.

Alopecia Areata

In alopecia areata, the immune system attacks the hair follicles, resulting in the arrest of the hair growth stage. Alopecia areata usually begins with one or more small, round bald patches on the scalp and can progress to total scalp hair loss (alopecia totalis) or complete body hair loss (alopecia universalis).

In all cases, the hair follicles remain alive and are ready to resume normal hair production whenever they receive the appropriate signal. Re-growth may occur even without treatment, and after many years.

Telogen Effluvium

This sudden loss of hair is triggered by stress, but is usually not permanent. It can be caused by emotional stress, such as from a divorce or a death in the family, or by physical stress, such as from childbirth, malnutrition, a severe infection or illness, or major surgery. Many medications can also cause temporary hair loss.

Anagen Effluvium

Anagen effluvium is extensive hair loss caused by sudden profound disturbances to the matrix cells of the hair follicles. Rather than shedding, the hair is lost by fracturing of the hair shafts at the level of the scalp. The two most common causes of anagen effluvium are chemotherapy and radiation therapy treatments.

Since chemotherapy targets your body’s rapidly dividing cancer cells, your body’s other rapidly dividing cells—such as hair follicles in the growing (anagen) phase—are also greatly affected.

Menopause

The onset of menopause causes a drop-off in the production of estrogen, and without estrogen to produce testosterone-blocking enzymes, testosterone can be freely converted to DHT on the scalp. The result is a shorter hair growth cycle, finer hair and gradual hair loss.

About 50% of women observe some degree of hair loss or thinning before age 50. Although hair loss may worsen with natural menopause, improvement has been observed in women who undergo surgical menopause because androgen levels plummet after the ovaries are removed.

Chemotherapy

While not all chemotherapy results in hair loss, most women do lose some or all of their hair, usually after their second treatment. The reason for this is that the chemicals used to combat cancer cells also weaken hair follicles, inhibiting hair growth.

It’s important to remember that most hair loss is not permanent and the hair usually grows back after treatments end. Unfortunately, no topical solutions (shampoos, cosmetic treatments, growth stimulants) can prevent or slow hair loss, and you should be particularly careful about what products you use on your skin during treatment.

Wear a wig

A wig can help you feel most like yourself. If you feel slightly apprehensive at the thought of wearing a wig, rest assured that today’s wigs are different than what you would have purchased years ago. Gone are the burdensome, heavy helmets of the past – they’ve been replaced by comfortable, lightweight, flattering styles that are easy to wear and care for.

Many women choose a style and color that are similar to their natural hair, while others take this opportunity to experiment with a new look.

Choosing the right wig style for you

There are several important factors to consider when choosing a wig, such as fiber type, style length, face shape – as well as lifestyle.

Consider fiber type: synthetic vs. human hair wigs.

Many women think that human hair wigs will be more natural looking. They fear that “synthetic” wigs will in fact look synthetic. This is not true!  Each type of wig has its own unique benefits.

Synthetic wigs are the most popular because they require the least amount of care. Today’s synthetic wigs offer more styling choices, colors and unique comfort features.

Shorter synthetic wigs are considered “shake-n-go,” meaning that all you do is shake them out and they look great. Longer styles simply need to be combed or finger-styled. Synthetic styles are easy to pack and take with you, and the fiber is resistant to humidity, so your style holds in any weather.

One thing that’s important to remember is that you never use heat on a synthetic wig! Any heat source, such as a blow dryer – or even an open oven – can damage the fiber and ruin the wig.

Human hair wigs are extremely versatile. You can curl and style them as you would your own hair. Because they do not come pre-styled, they require more effort than synthetic wigs. Human hair wigs are ideal if you enjoy, and are skilled at, styling your own hair.

Or you can take them to your regular stylist to have them styled for you.

Consider Style Length

As a rule,  shorter “shake-n-go” styles are easiest to care for. Longer synthetic styles require a little more maintenance. A common mistake women make is choosing a style that’s too long, which might not only be more work, but may overwhelm their features. Also remember that during treatment you may experience bouts of exhaustion, when you won’t want to fuss with your hair. The easier and more convenient your style is, the better off you’ll be.

Consider your lifestyle

What does your typical day involve? Will you be wearing your wig every day, or only occasionally? These questions, as well as others concerning your work, recreational and social activity, may affect which style you choose. Be sure to keep your typical daily or weekly activities in mind as you try different wigs.

Sizing

Many wigs are available in multiple sizes to ensure the ultimate in comfort and security. Remember that your measurements may change when your hair is gone.

Choosing a color

Many women feel most comfortable selecting a shade that matches their natural hair color. To do so, we recommend looking at your hair and color samples together under natural light to determine which color most closely resembles your own. You don’t have to choose a color identical to your own. Try going just a shade lighter or warmer than your natural color to brighten your features.

You can also choose styles with highlights that feature a subtle blending of shades for added depth and dimension. The goal is to find a shade that complements your skin tone and brings out your natural color.

A mistake many women make is choosing a color that’s too dark, especially given changes in skin color that occur during treatment. When in doubt, go a shade lighter. Your stylist can help you determine which shade works best for you.